The Liberation Files // Flat Shoe Icon Simone Weil

Yes! Journal

The Liberation Files // Flat Shoe Icon Simone Weil

Words by E.D. Willmett for YES Journal.

Something radical exists in the idea of wearing flat shoes. There’s a sense of wonderment placed into those toe-tapper boxes we send you. It’s a notion that you might be aware of your power throughout that day. Whatever it brings, all of the unknowns ahead of you. And, in some way, we want to be there with you, subtly reminding you that you’re radical. There are a few pairs of Wonder Woman eyes reading this, who are getting the feels.. If you’re still yet to be liberated in the movement of flat shoes, welcome, please find a comfortable seat. Life is going to be a bit more magical for you now. 

There is an unspoken sisterhood in the sole-grounded community. They are the women who have traditionally ‘gotten things done’ and, in some cases, inspired millions. Look to the feet and you get a clue, but there’s another type of recognising; the liberation inside.

Radical Yes Simone Weil

The flat shoe movement started long ago, but more recently it thrived in Britain’s industrial era in the 1800s then rose again in the late 1950s when stars like Audrey Hepburn soothed her heels on set with ballet flats. Although, we look to the real treasure in level toe-tappers, the Wonder Women who paved paths that we, in many ways, are guided by today.

Radical Yes Simone Weil

One woman in particular was Simone Weil who was born into a well regarded family in 1909. As a child, at the age of 5, she deprived herself of sugar as a way to sympathise with the men in the war who were doing without. It’s no surprise that she grew into a radical love-filled lady, her interests in philosophy, poetry and freedom manifested into incredible work up until her young death at 34. Part of her legacy includes her consistent dressing, her authenticity mirrored her values. writes in ‘Simone Weil: An Introduction to Her Thought’, “She wore clothes with a masculine cut, always the same outfit (a sort of suit with a very wide skirt and narrow jacket), and always flat-heeled shoes.”

She chose to work as a machinist in Parisian factories whilst on holiday breaks as a teacher of Philosophy. She wanted to level with people, to understand the soul, and to persevere through the many conflicts in her life. Weil is a Wonder Woman who was curious about her radical nature, and chose to wear it every day. 

A key part of being liberated is knowing your inner truth and working from a place of clarity. We’ve found that in order to let the mind wander, the feet need to be firmly on the ground.

Radical Yes Simone Weil

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